Alaska and Hawaii

"Alaska’s Oyster Farmers Are Filling an Acidification-Driven Void"

"The state’s oyster farming industry is gaining ground as growers elsewhere struggle."

"On a float house in Ketchikan’s George Inlet, dozens of cylindrical tanks teem with oyster larvae that range from tiny specks to small pebbles. These larvae number around 15 million, and once they’re done growing in the cold Alaskan waters, they’ll be sent to market across the state.

Source: Hakai, 10/12/2017

Beware Gateway Bugs Bringing Insect-Borne Disease

It's a deadly threat only fitfully reported by news media. But coverage of insect-borne diseases could be improved by environmental journalists who understand the intersection of bugs, humans and climate. A two-part Issue Backgrounder with basics, key resources and a rundown on significant illnesses brought by mosquitoes, and by ticks and other insects

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"Alaska's Grizzly Bears Drop Salmon for Berries as Climate Changes"

"When Kodiak Island's elderberries started ripening earlier, its icon bears changed their diet. It's another ecological shift amid climate change, scientists say. "

"Each summer, the shallow freshwater streams of Kodiak Island, Alaska, are so thick with sockeye salmon, you literally cannot cross the waterways without stepping on the brightly colored fish. With the salmon come brown bears, often dozens of grizzlies per stream, hauling the fish onto nearby banks for an easy meal.

Source: InsideClimate News, 08/22/2017

"Politics: 'Hard Call' From Trump Preceded Zinke Pressure — Murkowski"

"Sen. Lisa Murkowski said today that a tense phone conversation with President Trump earlier this week led to yesterday's call from Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke, who reportedly told both Alaska GOP senators that the Energy and Natural Resources chairwoman's vote against the motion to proceed to the health care debate would influence the administration's resource development policies in the Last Frontier State."

Source: Greenwire, 07/28/2017

Shark Week Media Frenzy a Chance to Actually Cover Sharks

The media frenzy whipped up by Shark Week broadcasts mask a harsh reality — humans kill millions more sharks than sharks kill humans, making the real story for reporters the struggle to save sharks. Get ideas and resources on the shark conservation story from this week's TipSheet.

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