Northeast (CT MA ME NH NJ NY RI VT)

November 28, 2012

Your Work in Seven Words: Inaugural Gathering of SEJ NYC

This unofficial SEJ NYC group seeks to build and sustain the professional ties between environmental journalists and editors in all media, who live and/or work in the New York City metro area. Photo: © Kate Lutz.

"New Jersey Railway Put Trains in Sandy Flood Zone Despite Warnings"

"New Jersey Transit's struggle to recover from Superstorm Sandy is being compounded by a pre-storm decision to park much of its equipment in two rail yards that forecasters predicted would flood, a move that resulted in damage to one-third of its locomotives and a quarter of its passenger cars."

Source: Reuters, 11/19/2012

"Sandy Stirs Up Superfund Site In New Jersey"

"As Northeast states take measure of the destruction brought by Hurricane Sandy, there's a new concern. New York and New Jersey have dozens of Superfund sites close to the shore. Some of these toxic zones were flooded by Sandy's storm surge. There are worries in Newark that toxic chemicals may have been swept into some people's home."

Source: NPR, 11/19/2012

"Political Support for a Sea Wall in New York Harbor Begins To Form"

"The cost of building sea barriers that would protect New York City and parts of New Jersey from storm surges is likely to run as high as $23 billion, according to the Dutch scientist commissioned by New York City to study how it might respond to the extreme weather events and rising sea levels brought about by climate change."

Source: ClimateWire, 11/16/2012

Contamination Warnings in Newark Bay, Lower Passaic, Hackensack Rivers

"Federal officials Wednesday warned people not to come in contact with the water or eat any fish or shellfish from Newark Bay and the lower Passaic and Hackensack rivers because contamination levels remain dangerously high after Hurricane Sandy crippled a key sewage treatment plant."

Source: Bergen Record, 11/15/2012

Boil Water Advisories Abound Across Sandy-Hit Area

Floods, sewage overflows, and power outages have made public drinking water supplies temporarily unsafe in many utility service areas across the states hit by superstorm Sandy. The best course of action for water users in those areas is to pay attention to messages from local utilities and state authorities.

Source: NJ DEH, 11/02/2012

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