National (U.S.)

Market Warms To Cimate Change Books In 2007

 

By BILL KOVARIK

 In 2006,Al Gore's An Inconvenient Truth dominated The New York Times best seller list. But in 2007, Glenn Beck's swaggering rebuttal, An Inconvenient Book, topped the same list with the idea that climate change is "the greatest scam in history."

While Beck's book has little chance of outselling Gore's book over the long run, the paradox illustrates a larger problem in the environmental publishing industry: serious science is a hard sell.

Don't Leave Climate Change, Environment To "Boys On The Bus"

By TIM WHEELER

Have the news media become bored with global warming already? It was one of the top news stories of 2007, thanks in large part to the Nobel-winning labors of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and former Vice President Al Gore. But as presidential contenders slogged through the snowy caucuses and primaries in their quest for the White House, the topic barely registered in news coverage of the campaigns. It almost never came up in televised debates.

O.K., It's Time To Play The Climate Change Card In The Campaign

 By BUD  WARD

The hard truth of the matter is that few of the reporters most likely to read this column will be in a good position to ask the presidential election front runners or nominees penetrating questions about environmental policy.

Few of them may have the opportunity, even briefly along a rope line, to probe a candidate's familiarity with "cap and trade" versus carbon taxes, wetlands restoration versus coastal development, nuclear energy versus coal versus biofuels versus conservation.

Publishing Paradox: Environment, A Hot Topic, Addressed In Fewer Books

   The new SEJ book award, along with plans for an increased emphasis on environmental books at this year's SEJ annual conference in Roanoke, VA, are reflections of an increasing interest in environmental book publishing among SEJ members.  Yet trends in the national marketplace of ideas seem paradoxical.

Two environmental books have topped the bestseller list in recent years—Al Gore's An Inconvenient Truth and Glenn Beck's An Inconvenient Book. (See page 11). That both would rise to the top of the market may seem to be a bit of a paradox.

SEJ Gains Ground For Press Freedoms, Information

 

By JOSEPH A. DAVIS

SEJ's efforts to roll back some of the government secrecy that has made reporters' jobs more difficult over the last decade won some ground since last year.

Working through its Freedom of Information Task Force, often with other journalism groups, SEJ's advocacy of open government posted successes on a variety of fronts. In fact, SEJ has often led the way for other groups.

Sunshine Week 2007 Audit Project

New Government Effort To Produce More Data On Toxic Chemicals

 

 By CHERYL HOGUE
 

We don't have a lot of information about many of the industrial chemicals that are in our air, water and soil, or those that are increasingly found in our blood.

This dearth of data often leaves audiences hanging when journalists report about pollution and biomonitoring. Too often, scientists just can't tell us what the presence of Chemical X in our bodies means.

Publishing Paradox: Environment, A Hot Topic, Addressed In Fewer Books

 Publishing Paradox:  Environment, A Hot Topic, Addressed In Fewer Books

By BILL KOVARIK
 

The new SEJ book award, along with plans for an increased emphasis on environmental books at this year's SEJ annual conference in Roanoke, VA, are reflections of an increasing interest in environmental book publishing among SEJ members. Yet trends in the national marketplace of ideas seem paradoxical.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - National (U.S.)