Planning & Growth

"American Cities Tapped to Spur 'Climate Resiliency' Action Worldwide"

"American cities on the frontline of climate action are quietly but dramatically shifting their approach -- from primarily trying to limit global warming to coping with its impacts. They're building forested buffers to shelter homes from wildfires, considering concrete sea walls to restrain ocean waters and developing software to conserve water during drought."

Source: InsideClimate News, 12/19/2013

Host City for SEJ Conference Maintains Sustainable Attitude

SEJ President’s Report

 By DON HOPEY

Chattanooga is much, much more than a train song.

It sings a more complicated and well-orchestrated sustainability refrain.

Fifteen years ago, when SEJ paid its first conference visit to Chattanooga, and sustainability was still a murky buzzword on its way to theoretical concept in many other American cities, this once tarnished “Buckle of the Bible Belt” was already on that track and well on its way to making it real.

New Homes Rise on Hazard-Prone Beach as Officials Seek Protection

"NORTH TOPSAIL BEACH, N.C. -- A crane swung a new roof truss into place above a house being built on this belt of sand last week, helping to expand development on what some experts say is one of the most dangerous islands to build on in the United States."

Source: ClimateWire, 12/03/2013

Dams and Levees: What You Don't Know Might Kill You

Tens of thousands of U.S. citizens are at risk from potential dam disasters, yet state and federal agencies hold to a policy that amounts to "out of sight, out of mind." The biggest danger, apparently, is that the public might find out about the dangers, and criticize insufficient dam safety measures, inconvenience private dam owners, depress real estate values, or demand public spending that is politically painful for those in office.

Dams and Levees: Introduction

This special issue of the WatchDog focuses on the transparency of safety information related to dams, levees, impoundments, and related water-control structures. For environmental journalists, these subjects offer a goldmine of great story possibilities. These are stories that have not been covered much in the past decade, and stories that fit well at the local, state, or regional level.

Get Feet Wet on Coastal Adaptation

Special Report: Part Three

By KATE SHEPPARD

Americans — and humans in general — have long flocked to the coasts. Thirty-nine percent of the U.S. population, or about 123 million of us, live in coastal counties. But many in coastal areas are finding it increasingly less hospitable due to sea-level rise and extreme weather events linked to climate change. As communities figure out how to adapt to these changes, it is often environmental journalists who are being asked to cover these complex stories.

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