Consumer

“Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River”

Writer David Owen's “Where the Water Goes: Life and Death Along the Colorado River” tells the story of the Colorado, while exploring water issues ranging from drought and climate degradation to cross-state and cross-border legal complexities.

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“Hot, Hungry Planet: The Fight to Stop a Global Food Crisis in the Face of Climate Change”

Author Lisa Palmer tackles a question many experts in the natural and social sciences are also pondering: How can we feed a growing world population in the coming decades when climate change is stressing global food production systems?

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To Report on Drinking Water, Know Its Source

Safe drinking water is a long-standing challenge left unmet all across the United States. As our latest Issues Backgrounder explains, telling the story of drinkable water requires digging beneath complex relationships, understanding the sources of drinking water and much more. Here's help to do it.

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Hundreds of Scientists Call For Caution On Anti-Microbial Chemical Use

"More than 200 scientists outline a broad range of concerns for triclosan and triclocarban and call for reduced use worldwide ". "Two ingredients used in thousands of products to kill bacteria, fungi and viruses linger in the environment and pose a risk to human health, according to a statement released today by more than 200 scientists and health professionals."

Source: EHN, 06/20/2017
May 31, 2017

DEADLINE: Food Sustainability Media Award

Launched by the Barilla Center for Food & Nutrition and the Thomson Reuters Foundation, this award will recognise the work of professional journalists and emerging talent from all over the world for excellence in reporting and communicating issues related to food security, sustainability, agriculture and nutrition. Cash and other prizes. Deadline is May 31, 2017.

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"That Perfect, Toxic Lawn: American Suburbs and 2,4-D"

"In 1945, the American Chemical Paint Company introduced its product Weedone, the first herbicide ever to hit the market that killed broad-leaved plants but not grasses. On farms, the weedkiller reduced the need for pulling weeds in grain fields, a godsend during the post-war labor shortage."

Source: KCET, 04/25/2017

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