Environmental Health

"Okla. Heat, Drought Allow Deadly Amoeba To Thrive"

"OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — High temperatures and an ongoing drought are having an impact on more than just crops and livestock. State health officials say they are also creating ideal conditions for the growth of a tiny, single-cell organism that lives in Oklahoma's rivers, lakes and ponds and can cause a disease that is almost always fatal."

Source: AP, 08/20/2012
September 18, 2012 to September 20, 2012

Climate Change Adaptation Forum Focusing on Food Security and Traditional Plant Use

This forum is for community‐level practitioners, academics, government representatives and community leaders who work in the area of climate change adaptation in First Nations, Métis, and Inuit communities in Canada and Tribes in the United States.

Analysis: "The Rising Tide -- Environmental Refugees"

"The modern world has long thought of refugees in strictly political terms, victims in a world riven by competing ideologies. But as climate change continues unabated, there is a growing population of displaced men, women and children whose homes have been rendered unlivable thanks to a wide spectrum of environmental disasters."

Source: New American Media, 08/16/2012

"Oregonians Fear Harmful Effects From Timberland Herbicides"

Rural residents near forest tracts in Oregon have tested positive for 2,4-D (an ingredient in Agent Orange) and atrazine in their urine -- and they think timber companies are to blame.

"BLACHLY, Ore. -- Six years ago, Eron King, an artist and young mother, moved from the edge of Eugene to a creekside plot of forest valley so her two boys could grow up raising hens and Toggenburg goats.

April 9, 2013 to April 13, 2013

AAG Annual Meeting

Get the latest in research and applications in environment, energy, climate, sustainability, and health GIS at the Association of American Geographers annual gathering in Los Angeles.

"Toxic Taps: Lead Is Still the Problem"

"Millions of Americans may be drinking water that is contaminated with dangerous doses of lead. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) knows it; state governments know it; local utilities know it. The only people who usually don’t know it are those who are actually drinking the toxic water."

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