Environmental Health

Gag Order Keeps Oregon From Telling Public About Cancer-Causing Pollutant

"Oregon officials think they've found high levels of a cancer-causing chemical in the air near a Lebanon battery parts maker, but a judge won't let them say a word about it.

Linn County Circuit Court Judge Thomas A. McHill on Friday agreed to Entek International's request for what appears to be an unprecedented gag order against state environmental and health regulators. Entek would be "irreparably harmed" if the regulators told the public about the preliminary finding, McHill wrote.

Source: Portland Oregonian, 04/11/2017

Review Of Dominion Power's Chesapeake Site Leaves Out Most Of Coal Ash

"State lawmakers this week agreed to stretch out a regulatory review of Dominion Virginia Power’s plan to permanently store coal ash at four sites, including in Chesapeake. ... But assessments planned by Dominion to help state regulators decide next year if the cap-in-place proposals are still sound may not include most of the ash stored at the Chesapeake site, the company has indicated."

Source: Norfolk Virginian-Pilot, 04/07/2017

"Kids Poisoned By Lead in CHA Housing; Landlords Still Got Paid"

"As private landlords increasingly take over the government's role of housing low-income families, dozens of children have been poisoned by brain-damaging lead while living in homes and apartments declared safe by the Chicago Housing Authority. Taxpayers often still paid the rent."

Source: Chicago Tribune, 04/07/2017

"Maine’s Wells Could Be Polluted With Arsenic, Lead"

"AUGUSTA, Maine — The water that flows out of your faucet may taste good, smell good and look good — but there’s a chance it could make you sick. That was the message from some scientists who shared their ongoing research last week at the Maine Sustainability & Water Conference, held each year by the Senator George J. Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions."

Source: Bangor Daily News, 04/05/2017

"Trump’s Budget Would Slash Funding for EPA’s Top Science Panel"

"In a 64-page agency budget document revealed by the Post Friday, a particularly deep cut is aimed at the agency’s 47-member Science Advisory Board, an august panel of outside advisers to the EPA created by Congress in 1978. The board, which is mostly comprised of academic scientists, reviews EPA research to ensure that environmental regulations have a sound foundation."

Source: Washington Post, 04/05/2017

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