Journalism & Media

The 'Unreadable' Thing: John McPhee On The Craft Of Writing

 

 By HOWARD BERKES 
You might think writing comes easy to John McPhee.

He's been at it more than 40 years, after all, producing 27 books, writing for The New Yorker since 1964 and teaching writing at Princeton since 1975. And, oh yes, he has that Pulitzer Prize. All those years and words and accomplishments ought to add up to confidence – even hubris, perhaps – when turning a sea of complex detail, facts and characters into smoothly flowing narrative.

Book Shelf: Grave Matters: A Journey Through the Modern Funeral Industry to a Natural Way of Burial

 

 Death, be not proud: A green sequel on funerals

GRAVEMATTERS: A JOURNEY THROUGH THEMODERN FUNERAL INDUSTRY TO A NATURALWAY OF BURIAL 
By Mark Harris Scribner, $24 
Reviewed by JIM MOTAVALLI

Looking for some bedside reading with a high "eeewwww" factor?

You can't beat Mark Harris' "Grave Matters: A Journey Through the Modern Funeral Industry to a Natural Way of Burial."

Help Keep SEJ And The environment In The Spotlight

 

 BY TIM WHEELER

The environment has enjoyed a terrific run in "the media" lately. Climate change has pushed onto the front page of newspapers repeatedly in the past year. It's garnered extended airtime on CNN, Fox and other broadcast outlets, and graced the covers of all kinds of magazines, from TIME to Vanity Fair, Vogue and, most recently, Sports Illustrated.

September in Palo Alto. How Sweet!

 

By CHRIS BOWMAN

Daffodils in January. Wildfires in February. Bermuda shorts in March.

Like seemingly everything in the environment these days, this year's SEJ annual conference has been scheduled remarkably earlier than usual: Sept. 5-9 at Stanford University.

The coals fueling your Labor Day barbeque will still be glowing as you pack for the pleasant climes of Stanford, heart of California's Silicon Valley.

The Future Of Newspapers: Websites, TV Reports And More

By JEFF BURNSIDE

 The intensifying drive to maximize newspaper websites means print reporters may get pulled in several new directions.

What's more, they'll be expected to do more in the same amount of time for no additional pay, and face the looming possibility of doing something akin to television news reporting – with little or no training.

So why are some leading environmental journalists embracing all this?

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