Journalism & Media

SEJ Objects Over EPA Response to AP Story; plus, Suits & Rulings Involving Interior, EPA, NOAA

The SEJ has written the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to object to its criticism of an Associated Press story about Superfund sites following Hurricane Harvey floods. That, plus a judge rules against EPA for withholding records on the pesticide Enlist Duo, and more, in this month's WatchDog.

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Homebuyers Not Told Houston's Reservoirs Would Flood Their Properties

"When Jeremy Boutor moved to a master-planned community in Houston’s booming energy corridor, he saw it as idyllic. ... Then, Hurricane Harvey changed everything. As the downpours began and Boutor studied maps flashing on his TV screen, he realized that his home wasn’t at risk of flooding just because of record rainfall; it was also located inside one of two massive reservoirs that had been built west of Houston decades ago to protect the city."

Source: Texas Tribune, 10/12/2017

FEMA Hides Data About Drinking Water And Electricity In Puerto Rico

"As of Wednesday, half of Puerto Ricans had access to drinking water and 5 percent of the island had electricity, according to statistics published by the Federal Emergency Management Agency on its Web page documenting the federal response to Hurricane Maria. By Thursday morning, both of those key metrics were no longer on the Web page."

Source: Washington Post, 10/06/2017

"Trump Administration Swaps 'Climate Change' For 'Resilience'"

"In the Trump administration's list of dos and don'ts, 'climate change' is out and 'resilience' is in. The word choices by administration officials -- and the extent to which they're going to avoid referencing global warming altogether -- are notable in the aftermath of recent severe hurricanes and in the face of questions about what could have caused them."

Source: CNN, 10/03/2017

An Absent EPA Climate Report, And A Tale Of Two Flooded Superfund Sites

"Hurricane Harvey flooded more than a dozen Superfund toxic waste sites when it devastated the Texas coast in late August. An EPA report predicted the possibility of climate-related problems at toxic waste sites like those in Texas, but the page detailing the report on the agency's website was made inactive months before the storm."

Source: NPR, 10/03/2017

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