Natural Resources

"More on Coke's Role in a Shelved Bottle Ban"

"Jon Jarvis, the director of the National Park Service, has said that its decision to scuttle a planned ban on small plastic water bottles at Grand Canyon National Park had nothing to do with opposition from the Coca-Cola Company. But a November 2010 e-mail released on Thursday in response to a Freedom of Information Act request tells a different story."

Felicity Barringer reports for the New York Times' Green blog December 1, 2011.

Source: Green/NYT, 12/02/2011

"The Impact of Grazing? Don't Ask"

"Millions of cattle graze on public lands all over the West and have done so for more than a century. But a new complaint filed by an environmental group charges that despite Clinton-era moves to examine and diminish the impact of grazing in the arid West, Interior Department employees have blocked the use of federal data on the impact in regional scientific studies.

Source: Green/NYT, 12/02/2011

BLM Says 9 Western States Have Worthy Wilderness Areas

Designating lands as wilderness or some other highly protected status always is contentious, but the BLM has identified 24 areas in 9 western states the agency says have significant local support for this idea: CA (9 areas), CO (3), ID (1), MT (1), NM (2), NV (2), OR (2), UT (3), and WA (1).

"Parks Chief Blocked Plan for Grand Canyon Bottle Ban"

"Weary of plastic litter, Grand Canyon National Park officials were in the final stages of imposing a ban on the sale of disposable water bottles in the Grand Canyon late last year when the nation’s parks chief abruptly blocked the plan after conversations with Coca-Cola, a major donor to the National Park Foundation."

Source: NY Times, 11/10/2011
November 17, 2011

Wind Energy, Wildlife, and Endangered Species

Co-sponsored by Patton Boggs LLP and the Environmental Law Institute, this seminar in Washington, DC will address the issues of wind power's adverse effects on birds and other wildlife, and related legal issues, from several points of view, including developers, environmental groups, and the federal government.

Loss of Coast Zone Program Hurts Alaska's Beluga Whale Case

"Back in February, the Parnell administration told a judge that Cook Inlet beluga whales didn't need the protection of the federal Endangered Species Act because the state was perfectly capable of protecting them itself, in part because of the Alaska Coastal Management Program. But in a notice belatedly filed in the case Friday, the Alaska attorney general's office acknowledged the state had lost that conservation and enforcement tool four months ago."

Source: Anchorage Daily News, 11/01/2011

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