Pollution

March 24, 2015

Implications of EPA's Coal Ash Rule on Regulated Entities and the Environment

On December 19, 2014, EPA’s Administrator signed the first ever federal rule regulating the disposal of coal ash, determining it should be regulated as a solid waste. The Environmental Law Institute invites you to Washington, DC (or via teleconference) for an in-depth examination of the final coal ash rule. Panelists will explain the rule’s workings and answer questions.

Arsenic, Nitrates Among Pollutants in California Drinking Water: Report

"California’s public drinking water systems violated safety levels for contaminants more than 1,000 times during the 2012-2013 fiscal year says a report that cites high levels in some water systems of arsenic, nitrates and other pollutants."

Source: Reuters, 02/19/2015

Discarded Russian Subs Could Cause a Nuclear Disaster in the Arctic

"The Arctic could become a site of future turmoil, and not just because of the emerging geopolitical tensions and militarization in the region. Beyond concerns of a frozen conflict in the icy north, there is the additional fear that the Barents and Kara Seas could become the location of a slow-motion nuclear disaster. Until 1991 the Soviet Union used the seas as a junkyard where it would dispose of its nuclear waste."

Source: , 02/18/2015

"U.S. EPA Chief Hints at Softening Carbon Rule Interim Timeline"

"The Environmental Protection Agency said on Tuesday that it may ease an interim deadline for states to meet tougher carbon emission standards after regulators and electric utilities complained a lack of time may destabilize electricity supplies."

Source: Reuters, 02/18/2015

Pebble Mine in Alaska: EPA Becomes Target By Planning for Rare ‘Veto’

"Just north of Iliamna Lake in southwestern Alaska is an empty expanse of marsh and shrub that conceals one of the world’s great buried fortunes: A mile-thick layer of virgin ore said to contain at least 6.7 million pounds — or $120 billion worth — of gold."

Source: Wash Post, 02/17/2015

"Officials Welcome Superfund Possibility for Hackensack River"

"The federal government’s decision to consider making the Hackensack River a Superfund site is drawing praise from local mayors and other elected officials — but that praise comes with caveats, including a sense that the Hackensack’s pollution is so pervasive and its hydrology so complex that trying to clean it up might be a fool’s errand."

Source: Bergen Record, 02/16/2015

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