"An Indiana City Is Poised To Become The Next Flint"

A chronic array of mysterious health problems among public housing residents in East Chicago, Indiana, was finally traced to soil contaminated with lead and arsenic by decades of industrial activity. Authorities from various government agencies had kept residents in the dark about the threat.

Source: Think Progress, 08/16/2016

"California Farm Communities Pay Price For Decades Of Fertilizer Use"

"A pollutant that has leached into California aquifers since farmers first began using synthetic fertilizer continues to accumulate and would not be removed from groundwater even if the state’s agriculture businesses abruptly quit using nitrogen-based materials to boost the productivity of their crops."

Source: Sacramento Bee, 08/16/2016

EPA Science Advisers Challenge Agency Report On The Safety Of Fracking

"Science advisers to the Environmental Protection Agency Thursday challenged an already controversial government report on whether thousands of oil and gas wells that rely on hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” systemically pollute drinking water across the nation."

Source: Wash Post, 08/12/2016

NC State Epidemiologist Resigns After McCrory "Misleads" on Well Water

"North Carolina’s state epidemiologist resigned Wednesday to protest her employer’s depiction that “deliberately misleads” how screening standards were created to test private wells near Duke Energy’s power plants."

Source: Charlotte Observer, 08/11/2016

"NC Chiefs Bash Scientist Warning Water Near Duke Pits Unsafe"

"North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory's administration on Tuesday again lashed out against a state toxicologist who said in sworn testimony he worried that state officials cleared well water near Duke Energy coal ash pits as safe to drink despite a chemical known to cause cancer."

Source: AP, 08/10/2016

"U.S. Must Bury Coal To Save Miner Jobs: Interior Secretary"

"From Appalachia to Wyoming, surging demand for cheap natural gas, tougher environmental regulations and multiple coal company bankruptcies have left behind a devastated coal business, lost jobs and billions of dollars in cleanup work. Many of the jobs are gone for good, but ex-miners can repair the damaged land and shape a post-coal economy, Interior Secretary Sally Jewell said on a recent visit to coal country, offering up a future starkly different from Donald Trump's."

Source: Reuters, 08/10/2016


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