Science

Standoff Over Climate Study Provokes National Uproar By Scientists

"A top House lawmaker’s confrontation with government researchers over a groundbreaking climate change study is provoking a national backlash from scientists, who say his campaign represents the most serious threat Congress has posed to scientific freedom."

Source: Wash Post, 11/25/2015

"Top Lawmaker Rebutted on Climate Study Accusation"

"The escalating struggle between an influential House Republican and government scientists over their pivotal study of global warming now turns on accusations that they rushed to publish their findings to advance President Obama’s agenda on climate change. But a spokeswoman for Science, the prestigious peer-reviewed journal that in June published the paper by climate scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, said in an interview that their research was subject to a longer, more intensive review than is customary."

Source: Wash Post, 11/24/2015

Corporate Money Fueled PR Campaign for Climate Doubt Over Two Decades

"Climate change has long been a highly polarizing topic in the United States, with Americans lining up on opposite sides depending on their politics and worldview. Now a scientific study sheds new light on the role played by corporate money in creating that divide."

Source: Wash Post, 11/24/2015

Haunting Film Explores Interface Between Tigers, People in Sundarbans

"Deep in the Sundarbans, a vast mangrove maze where the Ganges and two other great rivers weave their way to the coast in India and Bangladesh, the big-cat conservationist Alan Rabinowitz plays a video clip on his laptop for a cluster of men and women in an impoverished village where tigers — in one of their last big refuges — regularly kill or maim people scouring the shorelines for meager hauls of fish and crabs."

Source: Dot Earth, 11/20/2015

3 Scientists on Research They Couldn’t Discuss With Media Under Harper

"In the scientific community, Max Bothwell is regarded as the go-to guy on 'rock snot,' an unsightly but amusingly nicknamed invasive algae that grows in streams and riverbeds. He’s been an Environment Canada scientist for 36 years, studied the slimy blooms for 22 of those and has published considerable literature on the subject." The Harper government kept him quiet.

Source: Toronto Globe & Mail, 11/18/2015

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