Wildlife

"Slaughter of Horses Goes On, Just Not in U.S."

"LINCOLN, Neb. -- The closing of the country’s last meat processing plant that slaughtered horses for human consumption was hailed as a victory for equine welfare. But five years later just as many American horses are destined for dinner plates to satisfy the still robust appetites for their meat in Europe and Asia."

Source: NY Times, 10/25/2011
November 23, 2011 to November 24, 2011

International Forests Conference 2011

Conservation and Management of Forests for Sustainable Development: Where Science Meets Policy. European and international decision makers, journalists, civil servants and scientists in the domains of forestry, natural resources planning & management, environmental management, forest and biomass industry, and nature conservation will meet in Belgium to discuss what science can contribute to improved ecosystem services of forests in Europe and beyond.

November 1, 2011 to November 4, 2011

Natural Areas Conference 2011

Each year, the Natural Areas conference gives natural resource professionals and natural areas managers the chance to connect with and learn from others working in fields related to natural areas conservation. This year’s conference is hosted by the Natural Areas Association (NAA) with co-host National Association of Exotic Pest Plant Councils (NAEPPC) and will explore a range of topics concerning natural areas management and planning in the face of climate change. Tallahassee and the natural beauty of the Florida panhandle provide a stunning backdrop for the conference proceedings.

Voluntary Sage-Grouse Protection Efforts Awarded $71 Million

Greater sage-grouse are at just 3% of their historical numbers, and warrant protection, according to the Bureau of Land Management. But since other species are in even more dire straits, the birds haven't been declared a threatened or endangered species. The US Dept. of Agriculture money is a work-around aimed at saving the birds and their habitat.

Interior Probe of Polar Bear Scientist Baffles, Looks Political

Five years after writing about polar bears drowning, apparently from lack of sea ice, a wildlife biologist with the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement was suspended without a reason. Later he was told it was due to charges of "scientific misconduct" from a party or parties not identified.

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