EJ Academy

SEJournal Online EJ Academy banner

EJ Academy is a quarterly SEJournal Online column for environmental journalism educators and students to explore current research on environmental journalism, best practices or models for teaching and insights into the state of EJ education today. For questions and comments, or to suggest future EJ Academy columns, email the SEJournal Online EJ Academy editor Bob Wyss at robert.wyss@uconn.edu.

 

July 15, 2014

  • In this excerpt from the latest issue of SEJournal (Summer), Youngstown State University's Marc Seamon experimented in his undergraduate journalism classes last year with a self-guided project that would allow students to investigate the social-responsibility role of the media, particularly regarding the long-term implications of events and issues they cover. See the eye-opening results here.

April 15, 2014

  • In this excerpt from the latest issue of SEJournal (Spring), we debut the new EJ Academy column (a place for educators and students to explore current research on environmental journalism) with University of Michigan's Emilia Askari sharing how she and SEJ member Julie Halpert teach news innovation à la Knight Challenge style.

April 15, 2011

January 15, 2010

  • By BILL DAWSON

    The Beat usually examines recent coverage of environmental issues. This time around, though, The Beat looks at the environmental beat itself — specifically, at a couple of recent developments related to the training of journalists to cover environmental issues.

    The first event was the October announcement that Columbia University was suspending for review its two-year, dual-degree graduate program leading to one master's degree in journalism and another in environmental science.

October 15, 2009

  •  

    By WILLIAM DIETRICH

    We're midway through an academic quarter at Western Washington University's Planet magazine, and it's time for second-draft panic.

    The spring of 2009 is our student environmental magazine's 30th Anniversary, and we've got stories with no point, stories with gaping holes, stories that ignore AP style, stories with no lead, stories that stop instead of end, stories with no pictures, and pictures with no stories.

Pages