TipSheet

TipSheet is a source for story ideas, background, interview leads and reporting tools for journalists who cover news of the environment. Journalists are eligible for a free email subscription for future editions, to be produced on an occasional basis. To join the list, send name and full contact information to the SEJ office. TipSheet is also available via RSS feed.

Archives:  SEJ's last regular biweekly issue of TipSheet was published February 14, 2012. That issue, and others going back to Jan. 3, 2007, as well as issues published from from Dec. 26, 2001 to Jan 3, 2001, are available below. You can browse the older TipSheet archive, previous to May 2009, on SEJ's old website.

See also searchable archives of SEJ's ongoing biweekly WatchDog TipSheet, with story ideas, articles, updates, events and other information with a focus on freedom-of-information issues of concern to environmental journalists in both the U.S. and Canada.


Latest TipSheet Items

May 11, 2011

April 27, 2011

  • Last year's grant winners have efforts under way, so reporting can focus on progress that is being made, or not. Reporting on the new winners, announced in mid-April 2011, can inform the community about what is in the works, who is in charge, and what future benchmarks can be used to see if the money is being well spent.

  • Public meetings in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming from April 26 to May 5, 2011 will likely be newsy events, with advocates and critics representing industry, environmentalists, local governments, and other interested groups and individuals voicing their opinions.

  • New tools provide limited information on substances used in specific wells during the oil and natural gas extraction process called hydraulic fracturing. From 2005-2009, 780 million gallons of 750 substances were injected underground — a starting point for your coverage of this angle.

  • A National Fish Habitat Board report, which includes maps and mitigation efforts, identifies the primary human sources of US fresh- and saltwater habitat degradation as urban development, livestock grazing, agriculture, point source pollution, and areas with high numbers of active mines and dams.

April 13, 2011

  • The Dept. of Interior's Bureau of Reclamation released a report March 31, 2011, that highlights 70 existing dam, diversion structure, and other waterway operations in 14 Western states that could be expanded to generate more electricity.

  • According to a Dept. of Interior report requested by Obama and released March 29, 2011, 70% of existing federal oil and gas offshore lease acres and 57% of all federal onshore leased acres are inactive, with no production, exploration or development.

  • Every U.S. resident is at elevated risk of cancer from certain toxic substances in outdoor air, and about one-quarter of all residents are possibly at risk for noncancer health effects, according to EPA's update of the National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) released March 11, 2011.

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