Public

"Coal Ash Dam Failures Would Impact Hundreds, Maps Show"

"Raleigh, N.C. — Maps released by Duke Energy late last week reveal for the first time that nearly 300 individual structures – homes, businesses and town infrastructure – could be in danger of flooding as a result of dam failures at the energy firm's coal ash pits scattered across the state."

Source: WRAL, 10/11/2017

"In New Rule, Trump EPA Allows Texas Coal Plants to Pollute Even More"

"In a gift to the struggling coal industry, a new air pollution rule finalized by the EPA will allow Texas coal plants to emit almost twice as much sulfur dioxide than an earlier proposal by the Obama administration. Aside from being a key component in forming haze, sulfur dioxide exacerbates respiratory illnesses such as asthma and contributes to acid rain."

Source: Texas Observer, 10/11/2017

"E.P.A. Says It Will Write a New Carbon Rule, but No One Can Say When"

"When Scott Pruitt, the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, signed a blueprint Tuesday to eliminate a major Obama-era climate change regulation, the text said the agency would at some point consider a new rule to ratchet down greenhouse gas emissions. But those adept at reading between the lines of dense federal documents say the subtext reads more like: 'Don’t hold your breath.'"

Source: NY Times, 10/11/2017

Acidification Of Chesapeake Bay Threatens Crabs, Oysters, Other Life

"For ten days across recent summers, researchers aboard the University of Delaware research vessel Hugh R. Sharp collected water samples from the mouth of the Susquehanna River to Solomons Island in a first-of-its-kind investigation. They wanted to know when and where the waters of the Chesapeake Bay were turning most acidic."

Source: Baltimore Sun, 10/10/2017

Clean Water v. Farm Profits At Heart Of Debate on New Fertilizer Rules

"When Marla Waseka converted the gracious Franciscan nunnery northwest of St. Cloud to a boutique lakeside resort and retreat in 2008, the nitrate levels in her well were low. A few years later they were so high she had to warn her guests not to drink the water. And when authorities warned they’d shut her down if it weren’t fixed, she spent $12,000 to drill a deeper well for clean water."

Source: Minneapolis Star Tribune, 10/10/2017

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Public