Analysis: "Without Water, Revolution"

"This Syrian disaster is like a superstorm. It’s what happens when an extreme weather event, the worst drought in Syria’s modern history, combines with a fast-growing population and a repressive and corrupt regime and unleashes extreme sectarian and religious passions, fueled by money from rival outside powers — Iran and Hezbollah on one side, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Qatar on the other, each of which have an extreme interest in its Syrian allies’ defeating the other’s allies — all at a time when America, in its post-Iraq/Afghanistan phase, is extremely wary of getting involved."

"I came here to write my column and work on a film for the Showtime series, 'Years of Living Dangerously,' about the 'Jafaf,' or drought, one of the key drivers of the Syrian war. In an age of climate change, we’re likely to see many more such conflicts.

'The drought did not cause Syria’s civil war,' said the Syrian economist Samir Aita, but, he added, the failure of the government to respond to the drought played a huge role in fueling the uprising. What happened, Aita explained, was that after Assad took over in 2000 he opened up the regulated agricultural sector in Syria for big farmers, many of them government cronies, to buy up land and drill as much water as they wanted, eventually severely diminishing the water table. This began driving small farmers off the land into towns, where they had to scrounge for work."

Thomas L. Friedman reports for the New York Times Op-Ed page May 18, 2013.
 

Source: NY Times, 05/20/2013