Greenhouse Gas Reports Cover National, State and City Level

April 25, 2007

In the past few weeks, EPA, New York City, and U.S. PIRG have released potentially useful information on greenhouse gas emissions, covering the national, state, and city level.

EPA released its annual US greenhouse gas inventory on April 16, 2007. Press release. The agency says total emissions, including carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride, increased 0.8% during 2005. That increase is very similar to the average of 1% from 1990-2005. The agency emphasizes that the economy grew 55% in the same period. But the continuing increase is counter to the widely-recommended preference of decreasing greenhouse gas emissions in order to slow global climate change.

A report that tabulates what the advocacy group U.S. PIRG says is the first state-by-state data on the primary greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (84% of total greenhouse gas impacts), was released shortly before EPA's national report, on April 12, 2007 (summary and link to report). PIRG based its estimates on Energy Information Administration data.

PIRG found there were huge differences in trends in various states, with TX, FL, IL, NC, and GA having the greatest increase in CO2 from 1990-2004, and DE, MA, and Washington, D.C., showing no increase. Overall, power plants are responsible for 40% of all CO2 emissions, transportation accounts for 33%, and the rest come from other commercial, industrial, and residential sources. The report provides summary data for each year and state, as well as details for each state's power plant and transportation sectors. Many groups, including state PIRGs and others, coordinated on the report. If you're not sure who to contact in your state, check with U.S. PIRG's Rob Sargent, 617-747-4317.

Some city-level data is also becoming available. New York City released a report on its greenhouse gas emissions April 10, 2007, tracking the period from 1995 to 2006. The city says it's "the most comprehensive, detailed inventory of greenhouse gas emissions in US history." The data will provide baseline information as the city tries to reach its goal of a 30% reduction by 2030. New York's per capita production of greenhouse gases is already about one-third the national average, due in part to the extensive public transportation in the dense city, but without a change in course, total emissions are projected to increase 25% by 2030.

Other cities are at various stages in their efforts to address greenhouse gas emissions. One starting point for exploring what your city is doing is ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability (Annie Strickler, 510-844-0699 x328), which has 578 local government members in 68 countries. Members. Cities for Climate Protection Campaign, which includes more than 800 local governments around the world. Cool Mayors for Climate Protection (400 mayors in 50 states).

EPA released its annual US greenhouse gas inventory on April 16, 2007. Press release. The agency says total emissions, including carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and sulfur hexafluoride, increased 0.8% during 2005. That increase is very similar to the average of 1% from 1990-2005. The agency emphasizes that the economy grew 55% in the same period. But the continuing increase is counter to the widely-recommended preference of decreasing greenhouse gas emissions in order to slow global climate change.

A report that tabulates what the advocacy group U.S. PIRG says is the first state-by-state data on the primary greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (84% of total greenhouse gas impacts), was released shortly before EPA's national report, on April 12, 2007 (summary and link to report). PIRG based its estimates on Energy Information Administration data.

PIRG found there were huge differences in trends in various states, with TX, FL, IL, NC, and GA having the greatest increase in CO2 from 1990-2004, and DE, MA, and Washington, D.C., showing no increase. Overall, power plants are responsible for 40% of all CO2 emissions, transportation accounts for 33%, and the rest come from other commercial, industrial, and residential sources. The report provides summary data for each year and state, as well as details for each state's power plant and transportation sectors. Many groups, including state PIRGs and others, coordinated on the report. If you're not sure who to contact in your state, check with U.S. PIRG's Rob Sargent, 617-747-4317.

Some city-level data is also becoming available. New York City released a report on its greenhouse gas emissions April 10, 2007, tracking the period from 1995 to 2006. The city says it's "the most comprehensive, detailed inventory of greenhouse gas emissions in US history." The data will provide baseline information as the city tries to reach its goal of a 30% reduction by 2030. New York's per capita production of greenhouse gases is already about one-third the national average, due in part to the extensive public transportation in the dense city, but without a change in course, total emissions are projected to increase 25% by 2030.

Other cities are at various stages in their efforts to address greenhouse gas emissions. One starting point for exploring what your city is doing is ICLEI - Local Governments for Sustainability (Annie Strickler, 510-844-0699 x328), which has 578 local government members in 68 countries. Members. Cities for Climate Protection Campaign, which includes more than 800 local governments around the world. Cool Mayors for Climate Protection (400 mayors in 50 states).