Chemicals

"Pollution Portrait: The Fourth National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment"

"At first glance the results of the fourth edition of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s fourth National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment are sobering—the modeled data suggest that every person in the United States is at increased risk for getting cancer from outdoor air pollutants and that nearly a quarter of the population is at increased risk for certain noncancer health effects."

Source: EHP, 06/08/2011
June 21, 2011 to June 23, 2011

First International Conference on Food and Environment - The Quest for a Sustainable Future

The First International Conference on Food and the Environment in the UK will focus on a variety of issues affecting food production and distribution including those related to natural and anthropogenic causes. The conference will emphasise the effects of modern food production processes and how they can affect human health.

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"Did BP's Oil-Dissolving Chemical Make the Spill Worse?"

"BP succeeded in sinking the oil from its blown well out of sight — and keeping much of it away from beaches and marshes last year — by dousing the crude with nearly 2 million gallons of toxic chemicals. But the impact on the ecosystem as a whole may have been more damaging than the oil alone."

Source: Sarasota Herald-Tribune, 06/03/2011

"Texas Senate OKs Fracking Disclosure Bill"

"The U.S. Forest Service is weighing tighter restrictions on aerial fire retardant drops as part of a long-running legal battle over the environmental effects of pouring millions of gallons of the chemical mixture on Western wildlands every year.

Retardant use has soared in recent decades as wildfires have grown larger and more houses have been built on the wildland edge. Nationally, federal and state agencies apply an average of more than 28 million gallons a year, the vast majority of it in the West and much of that in California.

Nearly a third of the retardant used by the Forest Service in the last decade has been in California, where urban development abuts fire-prone wildlands and weather and terrain regularly produce monster blazes.

The proposed limits, outlined in a recently released environmental document, are not expected to cut overall usage. Rather, they are intended to reduce drops on and near waterways, where they can kill fish, and to slightly expand the acreage that is off limits to retardant releases for ecological reasons."

Bettina Boxall reports for the Los Angeles Times May 30, 2011.

Source: LA Times, 05/30/2011

USFS Releases Court-Ordered EIS for Fire Retardants

Information sessions and webinars on possible health and environmental effects of aerial-applied chemicals used to fight wildfires will be held in various locations around the country during the 45-day public comment period that ends June 27, 2011.

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