Wildlife

"Polar Bear Critical Habitat in Alaska Restored by Appeals Court"

"A 187,000 square-mile swath of land and sea in Alaska was restored by a federal appeals court as a “critical habitat” for polar bears, a boon for the endangered species and yet another blow to Alaska’s tumbling petroleum industry."

Source: Bloomberg, 03/02/2016

"In An Unusual Move, The EPA Tries To Pull A Pesticide From Market"

"Chances are, you've never heard of flubendiamide. It's not among the most toxic insecticides, and it's not among the widely used chemicals, either. In recent years, it has been used on about a quarter of the nation's tobacco and 14 percent of almonds, peppers and watermelons. But flubendiamide is now at the center of a public dispute between the Environmental Protection Agency and the company that sells it, Bayer CropScience."

Source: NPR, 03/02/2016

USDA Rejects Scientist's Claim It Tried To Hide His Pesticide Research

"Federal officials have rejected a complaint by an entomologist who charged that the government has tried to suppress negative research findings about a widely used pesticide, in a complex case involving monarch butterflies, scientific freedom and the safety of the nation’s food supply."

Source: Guardian, 03/01/2016

"Sage Grouse: Enviros Sue To Force Changes To Federal Plans"

"A coalition of environmental groups has filed a federal lawsuit challenging the Obama administration's sweeping greater sage grouse conservation plans across the West, claiming they are riddled with loopholes, scientific flaws and "political compromises" and won't protect the bird or its habitat."

Source: Greenwire, 02/26/2016

Deadly Virus Threatens Diversity of U.S. Salamander Populations

"A known killer is on its way to the United States, and government officials recently put out a warning to alert the public. When the feared virus known as Bsal lands on the backs of newts and salamanders destined for the pet trade, scientists predict that lots of wild salamanders are expected to die."

Source: Wash Post, 02/25/2016

"The Newest Strategy For Saving Bees Is Really, Really Old"

"In northwestern India, the Himalaya Mountains rise sharply out of pine and cedar forests. The foothills of the Kullu Valley are blanketed with apple trees beginning to bloom. It’s a cool spring morning, and Lihat Ram, a farmer in Nashala village, shows me a small opening in a log hive propped against his house. Stout black-and-yellow native honeybees — Apis cerana — fly in and out."

Source: Ensia, 02/17/2016

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