Environmental Studies

President’s Report: SEJ Reaches Out and Expands in Old and New Ways

By CHRISTY GEORGE

Hazardous waste, water pollution, the Exxon Valdez oil spill and difficulties in dealing with the EPA all made it onto page one of Volume 1, Number 1 of the SEJournal.

Looking back at the SEJournal's first edition, it's clear the issues haven't changed all that much in 20 years, even if the Journal itself has been transformed from a blue, black and white newsletter to a gorgeous, glossy, full-color magazine worthy of gracing anyone's coffee table.

March 7, 2010 to March 11, 2010

Society of Toxicology Annual Meeting

Hazards in the Environment

November 1, 2009 to November 5, 2009

American Society of Agronomy - Crop Science Society of America - Soil Science Society of America Annual Meeting

2009 ASA-CSSA-SSSA International Annual Meeting, Nov. 1-5 at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center, Pittsburgh, PA

Book Shelf, Book 2- The Winds Of Change: Climate, Weather, And The Destruction Of Civilization

 

 Climate change scientist paints a stark and vivid picture

THE WINDS OF CHANGE: CLIMATE, WEATHER AND THE DESTRUCTION OF CIVILIZATIONS By Eugene Linden 
Simon & Schuster, $26

Regulating Trade Could Curtail Invasive Species

 

By RHITU CHATTERJEE

In 2003, more than 50 people in the Midwest became ill with the monkey pox virus. The source for the African pathogen – pet prairie dogs that were kept next to infected Gambian pouch rats in a pet store.

In the early 1970s, Arkansas aquaculturists imported the Asian Black carp to control fish parasites in aquaculture ponds. Now these mussel-eating fish are happily lurking deep in the waters of the Mississippi River Basin. Scientists fear that they may be driving precious endangered snails and mussels to extinction.

Regulating Trade Could Curtail Invasive Species

 

By RHITU CHATTERJEE 

In 2003, more than 50 people in the Midwest became ill with the monkey pox virus. The source for the African pathogen – pet prairie dogs that were kept next to infected Gambian pouch rats in a pet store.

In the early 1970s, Arkansas aquaculturists imported the Asian Black carp to control fish parasites in aquaculture ponds. Now these mussel-eating fish are happily lurking deep in the waters of the Mississippi River Basin. Scientists fear that they may be driving precious endangered snails and mussels to extinction.

Publishing Paradox: Environment, A Hot Topic, Addressed In Fewer Books

 Publishing Paradox:  Environment, A Hot Topic, Addressed In Fewer Books

By BILL KOVARIK
 

The new SEJ book award, along with plans for an increased emphasis on environmental books at this year's SEJ annual conference in Roanoke, VA, are reflections of an increasing interest in environmental book publishing among SEJ members. Yet trends in the national marketplace of ideas seem paradoxical.

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