Disasters

"Nuclear Rules in Japan Relied on Old Science"

"In the country that gave the world the word tsunami, the Japanese nuclear establishment largely disregarded the potentially destructive force of the walls of water. The word did not even appear in government guidelines until 2006, decades after plants — including the Fukushima Daiichi facility that firefighters are still struggling to get under control — began dotting the Japanese coastline."

Source: NY Times, 03/28/2011

"10 Years On, Tsunami Warning Stumbles at the 'Last Mile'"

"In April 2012, Indonesia's Banda Aceh, the city worst hit by the tsunami that killed at least 226,000 people on Boxing Day ten years ago, received a terrifying reminder of how unprepared it was for the next disaster. As an 8.6-magnitude quake struck at sea, thousands of residents shunned purpose-built shelters and fled by car and motorcycle, clogging streets with traffic. A network of powerful warning sirens stayed silent."

Source: Reuters, 12/23/2014

"US Not Fully Prepared for Nuclear Terrorist Attack"

"WASHINGTON — The federal government isn't fully prepared to handle a nuclear terrorist attack or large-scale natural catastrophe, lacking effective coordination, and in some cases is years away from ensuring adequate emergency shelter and medical treatment, congressional investigators have found."

Source: AP, 12/19/2014

"Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster"

BookShelf

 

"Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster"

By David Lochbaum, Edwin Lyman, Susan Q. Stranahan and the Union of Concerned Scientists
The New Press, $27.95

Reviewed by TOM HENRY

First, let’s address the elephant in the room. No, not nuclear power. The Union of Concerned Scientists.

"Eternal Harvest: The Legacy of American Bombs in Laos"

BookShelf

 

"Eternal Harvest: The Legacy of American Bombs in Laos"

By Karen J. Coates, with photos by Jerry Redfern
ThingsAsian Press, $12.95 (paperback)

Reviewed by TOM HENRY

Although not an environmental book per se, “Eternal Harvest: The Legacy of American Bombs in Laos” is a great piece of journalism that environmental writers can use to rethink issues such as land use, chemical contamination and public safety.

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