Chemicals

"Bees Facing a Poisoned Spring"

"A new generation of pesticides is making honeybees far more susceptible to disease, even at tiny doses, and may be a clue to the mysterious colony collapse disorder that has devastated bees across the world, the US government's leading bee researcher has found. Yet the discovery has remained unpublished for nearly two years since it was made by the US Department of Agriculture's Bee Research Laboratory."

Source: UK Independent, 01/20/2011

Air Needs Freshening in Most U.S. National Park Units

The nation’s parks are generally thought to be pristine natural havens. But a recent study finds the overwhelming majority suffer from air pollution problems like smog and ozone. That makes for important local and regional news stories, per the latest biweekly TipSheet. Get background, story ideas, resources and more.

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Big Environmental Impacts on Small Communities Is Story That Must Be Told

While environmental journalists often focus on regulatory wrestling matches in Washington, D.C., a seasoned New York Times investigative reporter argues the most important stories are those in the real communities where bureaucratic impacts are felt. Three-time Pulitzer winner Eric Lipton makes the case for public service in journalism that tells the environment story from the outside in.

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"Blast Rips Through South Philadelphia Refinery, Triggering Major Fire"

"An explosion ripped through a refinery in South Philadelphia early Friday, lighting up the night sky and triggering a massive fire. No injuries were reported and it appears firefighters have contained the blaze."

Source: Philadelphia Inquirer, 06/21/2019

Primer Helps To Prep for Reporting on PFAS

It’s a category of more than 4,000 industrial chemicals that affect our lives nearly every day — and many of which are toxic. So what do journalists need to know to report on the emerging contaminants known as PFAS? Our most recent Issue Backgrounder offers a detailed primer on what PFAS are, where they come from, what their health effects are and how they might be cleaned up.

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Database Helps Track PFAS Drinking Water Contamination

Millions of people across the United States are believed to be drinking PFAS-contaminated water. And a growing database could prove an invaluable resource for environmental journalists trying to get a handle on that public health risk. Our latest biweekly Reporter’s Toolbox, recently refocused on data journalism tools and techniques, explains how to tap the expanding PFAS data.

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