Journalism & Media

Haunting Film Explores Interface Between Tigers, People in Sundarbans

"Deep in the Sundarbans, a vast mangrove maze where the Ganges and two other great rivers weave their way to the coast in India and Bangladesh, the big-cat conservationist Alan Rabinowitz plays a video clip on his laptop for a cluster of men and women in an impoverished village where tigers — in one of their last big refuges — regularly kill or maim people scouring the shorelines for meager hauls of fish and crabs."

Source: Dot Earth, 11/20/2015

Heeding J-Groups, Senate Panel Exempts Journos from Park Fees, Permits

After journalism groups protested federal rules imposing fees and permits on journalists working on public lands, the Senate Energy Committee November 19 approved a bill that would exempt newsgathering. By voice vote, the panel first approved an amendment containing the exemption, and then approved the underlying bill, S. 556, known as Bipartisan Sportsmen’s Act of 2015.

3 Scientists on Research They Couldn’t Discuss With Media Under Harper

"In the scientific community, Max Bothwell is regarded as the go-to guy on 'rock snot,' an unsightly but amusingly nicknamed invasive algae that grows in streams and riverbeds. He’s been an Environment Canada scientist for 36 years, studied the slimy blooms for 22 of those and has published considerable literature on the subject." The Harper government kept him quiet.

Source: Toronto Globe & Mail, 11/18/2015

SEJournal Summer 2007, Vol. 17 No. 2

In this issue: Taking readers on a journey; award winner focuses on eco damage being done now; investigative reporting can produce a ‘higher obligation’; effects of climate change on journalism; report probes multiple sources of global mercury pollution; studying smaller newspapers; basing coverage on scientific evidence; farm bill’s future environmental impacts; book reviews; and more.

What "Highly Message-Controlled" Agencies Mean for Health Reporting

Reporters trying to get information from federal agencies find press offices stonewalling and running out the clock on their interview requests. "The public information model," one agency flak said, "is dead." The result: the public is uninformed, the government is unaccountable, and people's health is endangered.

Source: Columbia Journalism Review, 11/13/2015

White House To Take Meeting With Journos on Access Issues

SEJ Members: Most of you have been aware of our efforts to lodge your complaints about agency press office intererence with news media access to scientists and officials. With over 50 other journalism groups, SEJ and its WatchDog Project have complained about it to the White House of President Obama, who promised his would be the "most transparent" administration ever. Now journalism groups have landed a December 15 meeting with Press Secretary Josh Earnest to discuss these issues. Here is a communication from the coalition's leaders.

December 1, 2015

DEADLINE: Reuters Global Journalism Summer Internship

Reuters offers students and graduates with a strong background in journalism a paid opportunity to learn at the world's largest international multimedia news provider. Available in NY and Washington bureaus, as well as Toronto, Mexico City, Sao Paulo and more. Apply by Dec 1.

"Muzzled Canadian Scientists Now Free To Speak With Media"

"The muzzles are coming off for [Canadian] federal scientists. For years, scientists who worked for the federal government were silenced by strict rules that made them seek departmental approval before speaking to the press. On Friday, Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development Navdeep Bains said that scientists are free to speak to the media about their work."

Source: Toronto Star, 11/09/2015


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