Natural Resources

May 13, 2012 to May 19, 2012

International Conference on Degrowth in the Americas

The International Conference on Degrowth in the Americas is part of an ongoing degrowth discussion, including conferences held in Paris (2008) and Barcelona (2010), and another to be held in Venice in September 2012 which present opportunities for learning how to avert ecological collapse while enhancing social justice and improving life’s prospects.

Checking Local Water Use and Scrutinizing Those Big Water Projects Can Benefit Your Community

Read this excerpt from the Winter issue of SEJournal: Author Cynthia Barnett explains water-use truths and fallacies, offers tips for investigating water projects proposed for your audience area, and reports how some of the country’s most progressive engineers and local governments are showing that it’s absolutely possible to live with far less water.

"Bold Plan Proposed to Save Coastal Louisiana"

"A $50 billion, 50-year proposal aspires to stop coastal land loss in Louisiana, build new levee systems to protect cities and even begin to slowly reverse the trend of eroding marsh that has turned the entire southern portion of the state into one of the nation's most vulnerable regions to sea level rise."

Source: AP, 01/13/2012

"Farm Conservation Program 'Under the Gun'"

"The farm bill is a favorite target of budget-cutters and those looking to reduce the size of government, particularly because about 80% of it encompasses food stamps and nutritional programs. However, it also contains some of the most successful conservation programs in our nation’s history, and those are now threatened with the ax, including the popular 1985 Conservation Reserve Program."

Source: LA Times, 01/13/2012

"Like Magic, Harry Potter's Owl Spotted Across US"

"LAKE ANDES, S.D. (AP) — Famous for its role as Harry Potter's companion in the books and movies, a species of majestic, mostly white owls is being sighted in abundant numbers this winter far from both Hogwarts and its native Arctic habitat.

It's typical for snowy owls to arrive in the U.S. every three or four winters, but this year's irruption is widespread, with birders from the Pacific Northwest to New England reporting frequent sightings of the yellow-eyed birds. As many as 30 were spotted in December around South Dakota's Lake Andes.

Source: AP, 01/06/2012

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