Mexico

June 16, 2019

DEADLINE: GRID-Arendal Investigative Environmental Journalism Grants

GRID-Arendal, through its Environmental Crime Programme, two grant recipients NOK 25,000 (approximately 2,500 Euros) each for investigative journalism projects focusing on illegal fisheries and illegal logging  in a country that is on the DAC list of Official Development Assistance (ODA) recipients. Deadline is Jun 16, 2019.

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Forging a Future for a ‘Forgotten River’

Washington, D.C.’s long-neglected Anacostia River bears both tragedy and beauty. And author Krista Schlyer plumbs its depths in her most recent book, “River of Redemption.” In this Between the Lines, she speaks of her connection to the urban waterway, as well as her latest reporting on the environmental impact of the border wall.

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To Save Monarch Butterfly, Mexican Scientists Move Forest Up A Mountain

"As a boy, Francisco Ramirez Cruz loved hiking with his grandfather up into the mountains of central Mexico. While the old man grazed sheep or hunted for wild mushrooms, Ramirez would play amid the throngs of monarch butterflies that migrated 3,000 miles to this forest each autumn, turning the blue sky into a sea of orange."

Source: LA Times, 04/10/2019

Mexican, US Officials Discuss Fixes For Failing Sewer Systems On Border

"Mexican and American officials met in Mexico City this week to talk about fixing a costly set of problems that have sprung up along the border: failing sewer systems that send raw sewage spilling into rivers."

Source: Arizona Republic, 04/05/2019

Doc on Rare Porpoise Wins Sundance Award

An environmental documentary that follows a risk-laden effort to save a rare and elusive porpoise won over audiences at the recent Sundance Film Festival. Correspondent JoAnn Valenti takes a look at the film, along with other documentaries that explore the role of journalists and journalism. 

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Can States Divvy Up the Shrinking Colorado River Water Supply?

The vast Colorado River, recently in the news over a troubled drought deal, is at the heart of numerous environmental problems in the American West, where water is scarce and the legal complexities of water rights voluminous. The latest Issue Backgrounder offers an explainer on the story, which involves at least seven states, the federal government, Native American tribes, a hornet’s nest of irrigation districts and even Mexico.

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Border Wall a Way into Environmental Stories

The fierce contest over the Trump border wall has critical environmental implications, both local and regional, per the latest TipSheet. A key suit against the Trump emergency declaration was filed by environmental groups and plans for a border barrier may harm significant wildlife habitat, as well as numerous migrating species, including some that are endangered. Get the back story and why it matters, along with story ideas and reporting resources.

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"Border Barrier No One Wants Grows Without Money to Slow Spread"

"Carrizo cane is the border wall no one wants. A pernicious plant on the banks of the Rio Grande along the U.S.-Mexico border, carrizo cane (Arundo donax) grows as much as 30 feet tall and so thick that people entering the country illegally can easily hide in it. Border patrol officers can’t see into it. Infrared signals can’t penetrate it."

Source: Bloomberg Environment, 02/21/2019

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