Climate Change

Regional, State Interests May Dominate Future Climate & Energy Policy

"The failure of climate legislation in the Senate last week is a blunt reminder of a basic truth, experts say: The nation's energy policies are historically driven by state and regional interests that will trump national agendas in all but the most compelling circumstances.

Source: ClimateWire, 07/28/2010

Efforts to Block EPA's Greenhouse Gas Regulations Back in Play"

"Over the past two years, cap-and-trade advocates used the threat of U.S. EPA climate regulations as a key driver in the push for climate legislation on Capitol Hill. Now, Democratic leaders face the challenge of renewed bipartisan interest in handcuffing EPA before it takes action."

Source: ClimateWire, 07/26/2010

"B.C.'s Shellfish Industry Can't Aid Oil Spill Recovery"

"West Coast oyster farmers are fielding calls from farmers on the Gulf of Mexico as the work begins to replace the shellfish breeding beds damaged by the massive oil spill. But while shellfish farmers in the Pacific Northwest are anxious to help, they say they have little to offer."

Source: Vancouver Province, 07/26/2010

"Senate Energy Package: Wait, It Gets Worse!"

"Just got confirmation from several Senate offices about what is actually going to be in the package Democrats put forward next week. In a nutshell, this is going to be a very tiny package, with little in the way of energy measures. I'm not even sure you can call it an energy package at this point."

Source: Mother Jones, 07/23/2010

"Democrats Call Off Climate Bill Effort"

"The effort to advance a major climate change bill through the Senate this summer collapsed Thursday ... Bowing to political reality, Senator Harry Reid, the Nevada Democrat and majority leader, said the Senate would not take up legislation intended to reduce carbon emissions blamed as a cause of climate change, but would instead pursue a more limited measure focused on responding to the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and tightening energy efficiency standards."

Source: NYTimes, 07/23/2010


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