Water & Oceans

July 17, 2014

Conference Call To Discuss New Report "The Hardest Working River in the West: Common-Sense Solutions for a Reliable Water Future for the Colorado River Basin"

This Thursday (7/17), at 11 a.m. MST/ 10 a.m. PST, Bart Miller, Western Resource Advocates's Water Program Director, and Matt Rice, American Rivers' Director of Colorado Conservation, will host a call to discuss the solutions presented in the new paper. Can't make the call? There's a link to the report available.

Toolbox: Fracking Resources (SEJ/McCormick Specialized Reporting Institute on Shale Gas and Oil Development, June 2014)

The Society of Environmental Journalists hosted a McCormick Specialized Reporting Institute (SRI) on Shale Gas and Oil Development, June 22-24, 2014 in Pittsburgh, PA, to help journalists understand the legal, scientific, health and economic issues surrounding shale gas and oil development, and give them the context needed so that they can better inform their communities about these important topics. Here we share the resources resulting from that event and more.

"Appeals Court Upholds Obama's Crackdown on Mountaintop Mining"

"A federal appeals court today sided with U.S. EPA in a broad challenge from two states and the mining industry to controversial Obama administration policies aimed at addressing the environmental effects on waterways of mountaintop-removal coal mining."

Source: Greenwire, 07/14/2014

Near Saltwater Spill, Native Americans Wrestle With Impact of Oil

"MANDAREE, N.D. — Growing up, Ruth Anna Buffalo would follow the dirt track behind her house into the rugged North Dakota badlands, swimming in creeks picketed with beaver dams, finding artifacts and climbing bluffs overlooking Lake Sakakawea. For the young, the lake and the land around it were a wonderland."

Source: AP, 07/14/2014

"Texas Law Reducing Dam Inspections Sparks Criticism"

"DALLAS -- Texas has stopped inspecting 44% of the dams in the state, following passage last year of a state law that exempted most privately owned dams from safety requirements. Now, as a drought dries up large portions of the Southwest, some dam-safety experts and officials are questioning the law, saying the dry spell is leaving webs of cracks along the surface of earthen dams that may make them weaker—and prone to triggering floods—when rains eventually fill them up again."

Source: Wall St. Journal, 07/14/2014

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