Northwest (OR WA)

U.S. Acknowledged the Harm Dams Have Caused Tribes. Here’s What It Left Out

"The Biden administration said officials historically gave “little, if any, consideration” to impacts on tribal fishing. But some sought deliberately to upend the harvest, according to documents obtained by ProPublica and Oregon Public Broadcasting."

Source: OPB/ProPublica, 06/27/2024

Judge Orders BNSF To Pay Tribe $400 Million For Trespassing With Oil Trains

"BNSF Railway must pay nearly $400 million to a Native American tribe in Washington state, a federal judge ordered Monday after finding that the company intentionally trespassed when it repeatedly ran 100-car trains carrying crude oil across the tribe’s reservation."

Source: AP, 06/21/2024

Makah Tribe Wins U.S. Waiver To Resume Hunting Pacific Gray Whales

"After a decades-long struggle, a Native American tribe won the right to resume its hunting traditions off Washington state's coast when federal regulators granted a waiver on Thursday allowing the Makah people to hunt up to 25 gray whales over a decade."

Source: Reuters, 06/14/2024

Oregon Closes More Coastal Shellfish Harvesting Due To High Toxins

"Oregon authorities have expanded shellfish harvesting closures along the state’s entire coastline to include razor clams and bay clams, as already high levels of toxins that have contributed to a shellfish poisoning outbreak continue to rise."

Source: AP, 06/10/2024

Spurt in Hydro Relicensing To Leave U.S. Awash in Environmental Stories

Hundreds of hydropower dams in the United States will see their licenses expiring in the next decade, generating years-long federal relicensing processes. That prospect calls for close local and regional coverage of the complicated balance between renewable energy needs with negative environmental impacts. The latest TipSheet explains the licensing process and the dam backstory, along with a dozen story ideas and reporting resources.

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Courage and Caring — Documentary Celebrates Environmental Icon Stewart Udall

While the name of Stewart Udall, U.S. interior secretary through the tumultuous 1960s, may have faded from public memory, his influence on environmental policies is still felt today. Contributor Francesca Lyman shines the spotlight on a new documentary about Udall and his legacy, and talks with director John de Graaf about Udall’s insights and inspiration.

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