Biodiversity

Things related to the web of life; ecology; wildlife; endangered species

May 1, 2012

Two CAMEL (Climate, Adaptation, Mitigation, E-Learning) Webinars

NASA Time Machine Visualization on May 1st will introduce you to exciting resources for teaching about climate change science and solutions that are located on the CAMEL web portal.

Visibility: 

"Analysis: Dow's New Corn: 'Time Bomb' Or Farmers' Dream?"

"A new biotech corn developed by Dow AgroSciences could answer the prayers of U.S. farmers plagued by a fierce epidemic of super-weeds. Or it could trigger a flood of dangerous chemicals that may make weeds even more resistant and damage other important U.S. crops. Or, it could do both."

Source: Reuters, 04/25/2012

Comment: "Silent Hives"

"In 2006, when beekeepers began to report that their hives were suffering from a mysterious affliction, a wide variety of theories were offered to explain what was going on. ... Over the last few weeks, several new studies have come out linking neonicotinoids to bee decline. As it happens, the studies are appearing just as 'Silent Spring,' Rachel Carson’s seminal study of the effect of pesticides on wildlife, is about to turn fifty: the work was first published as a three-part series in The New Yorker, in June, 1962. It’s hard to avoid the sense that we have all been here before, and that lessons were incompletely learned the first time around."

Source: New Yorker, 04/23/2012

"For Weed Warriors, the Motto Is Endurance"

"To the untrained eye, a weed is just a weed, and few of us can tell a thistle from a teasel. But for Paul Heiple and his team of Weed Warriors, knowing the difference is essential to their work routing out invasive plants that threaten the native species at Edgewood Park, a 500-acre natural preserve that overlooks California’s Silicon Valley."

Source: Green (NYT), 04/20/2012

"U.S. Suggests No Emissions Limits To Protect Polar Bears"

"SEATTLE -- Polar bears are skating on thin ice in Alaska these days: Warming temperatures have resulted in dramatic shrinkage of sea ice, leaving the bears with fewer ice floes on which to rest and hunt seals. But at least for the moment, the Endangered Species Act won't be used to control the greenhouse gas emissions that conservationists say are contributing to climate change and posing one of the biggest threats to the bears' survival."

Source: LA Times, 04/18/2012

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