Reporting on Turkey, Trauma-Free

Turkeys are a favorite American food, but also a multi-billion-dollar industry with myriad environment and food safety issues, not to mention confusing consumer labelling. With Thanksgiving approaching, this week's TipSheet helps reporters carve out a bird beat, serving up story ideas, resources and more.

SEJ Publication Types: 

Teaching Journalism Skills … To All Comers

If you can both do and teach journalism, your skills are in demand, writes educator Dave Poulson in the new EJ Academy column. Here's how to maximize your chances of finding such opportunities. Plus, Poulson's take on the value of fostering reporting skills and journalistic values, even among non-journalists.

SEJ Publication Types: 

"La Niña Is Here. What Does That Mean For Our Winter?"

"La Niña, the cooler sibling of El Niño, is here. The La Niña climate pattern — a natural cycle marked by cooler-than-average ocean water in the central Pacific Ocean — is one of the main drivers of weather in the U.S. and around the world, especially during the late fall, winter and early spring."

Source: USA TODAY, 11/10/2017

"California Cracks Down On Weed Killer As Lawsuits Abound"

"Jack McCall was a fixture at the local farmers market, where he sold avocados and other fruits he grew on his 20-acre ranch in Cambria, on California’s Central Coast. The U.S. postal worker and Little League coach was “very environmentally friendly,” said Teri McCall, his wife of 41 years. He avoided chemicals, using only his tractor-mower to root out the thistle and other weeds that continually sprouted on the flat areas of the ranch."

Source: Kaiser Health News, 11/08/2017

"Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats”

A new book on "Big Chicken" dissects how common practices of the U.S. poultry industry are harming our air, water and health — and why Europe does it better. 

SEJ Publication Types: 

"Crops in 25 States Damaged by Unintended Drift of Weed Killer"

"A weed killer called dicamba has damaged more than 3.6 million acres of soybean crops, or about 4 percent of all soybeans planted in the United States this year, the Environmental Protection Agency said Wednesday in calling for an urgent federal response."

Source: NY Times, 11/03/2017


Subscribe to RSS - Agriculture