Nuclear Power & Radiation

"Nuclear Rules in Japan Relied on Old Science"

"In the country that gave the world the word tsunami, the Japanese nuclear establishment largely disregarded the potentially destructive force of the walls of water. The word did not even appear in government guidelines until 2006, decades after plants — including the Fukushima Daiichi facility that firefighters are still struggling to get under control — began dotting the Japanese coastline."

Source: NY Times, 03/28/2011
September 23, 2020 to September 27, 2020

SEJ's 30th Annual Conference, Boise, ID, Sept. 23-27, 2020

Environmental Journalism 2020 will be hosted by Boise State University in Boise, Idaho. Idaho bridges more than the continental divide: A red state with a streak of bright purple, Idaho banks on tech, recreation and agriculture. Its history of logging, ranching and mining has left a complicated legacy on its awe-inspiring landscape. In Boise, America’s fastest growing city, you can ski and golf on the same winter day. But the challenges and opportunities facing state and tribal governments are familiar: urban sprawl, limited resources, energy sources, and conserving the wild for future generations.

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SEJ's 30th Annual Conference, Boise, ID, Sept. 23-27, 2020

Environmental Journalism 2020 will be hosted by Boise State University in Boise, Idaho. Idaho bridges more than the continental divide: A red state with a streak of bright purple, Idaho banks on tech, recreation and agriculture. Its history of logging, ranching and mining has left a complicated legacy on its awe-inspiring landscape. In Boise, America’s fastest growing city, you can ski and golf on the same winter day. But the challenges and opportunities facing state and tribal governments are familiar: urban sprawl, limited resources, energy sources, and conserving the wild for future generations.

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How US Betrayed Marshall Islands, Kindling The Next Nuclear Disaster

"Five thousand miles west of Los Angeles and 500 miles north of the equator, on a far-flung spit of white coral sand in the central Pacific, a massive, aging and weathered concrete dome bobs up and down with the tide. Here in the Marshall Islands, Runit Dome holds more than 3.1 million cubic feet — or 35 Olympic-sized swimming pools — of U.S.-produced radioactive soil and debris, including lethal amounts of plutonium."

Source: LA Times, 11/11/2019

"A “Critical” Battle Over Uranium Mining In The Grand Canyon Area"

"The Grand Canyon Centennial Protection Act, which passed the House today [Wednesday] by a vote of 236–185, would permanently withdraw more than 1 million acres of public lands surrounding the Grand Canyon from new mining claims."

Source: Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, 10/31/2019

Award-Winner Chronicles Radioactive Risks at Midwest Nuclear Plants

A deeply documented investigation revealed serious problems in Illinois’ aging nuclear power plants, and won reporters Brett Chase and Madison Hopkins an outstanding small market investigative reporting award from the Society of Environmental Journalists last year. Chase spoke with SEJournal Online’s “Inside Story” about the “Power Struggle” project, about lessons learned and advice for other reporters. Read the Q&A.

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