Food

Children Dying In Somalia As Climate-Driven Food Catastrophe Worsens

"More than 200,000 Somalis are suffering catastrophic food shortages and many are dying of hunger, with that number set to rise to over 700,000 next year, according to an analysis by an alliance of U.N. agencies and aid groups."

Source: Reuters, 12/13/2022

Corn Nourishes Hopi Identity, but Climate-Driven Drought Stresses Tribe

"Most Hopi grow corn with only the precipitation that falls on their fields, but two decades of drought have some of them testing the waters of irrigation and hoping they can preserve other customs with their harvests."

Source: Inside Climate News, 11/28/2022

Journalism Industry Program Supports Reporting on Workers — and Work — in a Warming World

As the economic impacts of climate change intensify, reporting on how individuals are affected, particularly in the Global South, is lagging. Veteran journalist Christine Spolar at The Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting details a new initiative to encourage journalists to fill this gap. The story of recent grantees Bhasker Tripathi and Susan Schulman, who have tracked job losses and migrations tied to climate change in India and Iraq.

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Climate Change Threatening ‘Things Americans Value Most’ -- U.S. Report

"Climate change is unleashing “far-reaching and worsening” calamities in every region of the United States, and the economic and human toll will only increase unless humans move faster to slow the planet’s warming, according to a sprawling new federal report released Monday.

Source: Washington Post, 11/08/2022

Big Agriculture Warns Farming Must Change Or Risk ‘Destroying The Planet’

"Food companies and governments must come together immediately to change the world’s agricultural practices or risk “destroying the planet”, according to the sponsors of a report by some of the largest food and farming businesses released on Thursday."

Source: Guardian, 11/03/2022

How a Distant Chapter in Spice Trade Foretells Today’s Climate Chaos

When Europeans colonized remote Indonesian islands centuries ago to dominate the trade in nutmeg and cloves, they were repeating a pattern of domination of peoples and nature that author Amitav Ghosh argues in his latest book has brought us to the present-day environmental crisis. BookShelf reviewer Melody Kemp offers praise for the book’s strong narrative qualities and incisive historical analysis.

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