Chemicals

For Waste Industry, PFAS Disposal Leads to Controversy, Regulation, Mounting Costs

The toxic compounds known as PFAS are causing a crisis in the waste and recycling industry, which faces mounting regulation and litigation over handling its presence in the waste stream. One reporter on the PFAS front lines explains the industry’s dilemma, as well as the challenges of covering the story and how a financial prism led to important insights into industry’s response.

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"Some Areas Protected As Formosa’s Louisiana Work Continues"

"A Taiwan-based company and opponents to plans for a $9.4 billion plastics complex have agreed that site preparation can continue except in wetlands and in five known or possible sites of enslaved people’s graves."

Source: AP, 11/05/2020

"Getting the Lead Out: Why Battery Recycling Is a Global Health Hazard"

"From African shantytowns to the backstreets of China’s cities, small-scale businesses that recycle the lead from auto batteries are proliferating. Experts say the pollution from these unregulated operations is a lethal threat – with children being the most vulnerable to poisoning."

Source: YaleE360, 11/03/2020

"Dozens of Chlorpyrifos Lawsuits Coming Over Children’s Health"

"The recent lawsuits filed against Corteva Inc. and Dow Chemical Co. in California are the beginning of an expected wave of toxic tort cases in the Golden State that take aim at the widely-used insecticide chlorpyrifos."

Source: Bloomberg Environment, 10/30/2020

"Parents Sue Chlorpyrifos Makers Corteva, Dow Over Child’s Autism"

"The farmworker parents of a girl with autism, obesity, and vision problems are suing Dow Chemical Co., Corteva, a California town, and two pesticide application companies, claiming that exposure to the powerful insecticide chlorpyrifos led to her significant health problems."

Source: Bloomberg Environment, 10/29/2020

Auditor Slams CA For Exide Cleanup Delays, Sees Costs Near $650 Million

"The cleanup of thousands of lead-contaminated homes, child-care centers, schools and parks surrounding the closed Exide battery recycling facility in Vernon is running behind schedule and over budget due to poor management by California regulators and has left children at continued risk of poisoning, according to a state audit released Tuesday."

Source: LA Times, 10/28/2020

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