Chemicals

Where Has All The Honey Gone? Scientists Explain Declining Yields

"It’s a question that has bedeviled beekeepers across the US in recent years: where has all the honey gone? Scientists now say they have some answers as to why yields of honey have declined, pointing to environmental degradation that is affecting all sorts of bees, and insects more generally."

Source: Guardian, 01/09/2024

"Three Of California’s Biggest Climate Polluters Are In The Bay Area"

"California’s largest greenhouse gas polluters, from power plants to oil refineries to chemical manufacturers, produced slightly fewer emissions last year than the previous year, federal data shows. But it’s still too much planet-warming gas to cut significantly into the problem of climate change, environmentalists say."

Source: San Francisco Chronicle, 01/08/2024

Personal Care Products — Bringing the Problems Home

Health and environmental concerns about some beauty items — like the use of formaldehyde in certain hair straighteners — have started to emerge as a focus for federal regulation. But as the latest TipSheet points out, the response has been slow and fitful. Meanwhile, here are story ideas and resources to help reporters find local angles for this environmental and public health hazard.

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Analysis: "‘Forever Chemicals’ Contaminate America’s Freshwater Fish"

"A recent study from The Environmental Working Group found that just one serving of fish can be equivalent to a month of drinking water contaminated with 48 parts per trillion of the common chemical PFOS."

Source: Washington Post, 01/05/2024

Proposed Youngstown Tires-To-Gas Plant Paused Over Environmental Justice

"Officials in Youngstown, Ohio, have dealt a setback to a company’s plan to build and operate a recycled tire waste-to-energy plant near the center of the city and adjacent to a neighborhood of predominantly Black residents, enacting a one-year moratorium on such industrial processes."

Source: Inside Climate News, 01/04/2024

‘Major’ Problem in Texas: Polluters Evade Federal Law and Get Away With It

"Industrial developers describe facilities as “minor” polluters to avoid federal permitting requirements, and environmental lawyers say the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality lets it happen."

Source: Inside Climate News, 01/03/2024

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